Mask Requirement (updated 18 Apr 2022)
😷 Masks are not required, neither indoors (with some execptions) nor outdoors. Masks are recommended in indoor situations where you cannot be certain of the vaccination status of other people
😷 Masks are required inside airports, per Federal/CDC mandates
😷 Masks are required at events/activities where 1000 or more people are gathered, effective 18 Apr 2022
😷 Masks are required indoors in places like hospitals, emergency rooms, nursing homes, medical offices, health centers, clinics, labs, pharmacies, and on public transportation (including taxis and buses). The Department of Health may make masks mandetory in other situations where their use is deemed necessary.
😷 Owners and operators of public and private establishments may, at their discretion, implement health measures that they deem necessary - including requiring the use of masks.
📄 These changes go into effect 10 Mar 2022, per Executive Order EO-2022-019
Restaurants, Bars & other Food Establishments (updated 08 Mar 2022)
👪 The capacity limit has been removed, as has the requirment to check for vaccination card or negative test result
😷 Owners and operators of public and private establishments may, at their discretion, implement health measures that they deem necessary - including requiring the use of masks, and screening for vaccination status or negative test results
📄 These changes go into effect 10 Mar 2022, per Executive Order EO-2022-019
Hotels, Resorts & other Lodging (updated 08 Mar 2022)
👪 The requirment to check for vaccination card or negative test result has been eliminated
😷 Owners and operators of public and private establishments may, at their discretion, implement health measures that they deem necessary - including requiring the use of masks, and screening for vaccination status or negative test results
📄 These changes go into effect 10 Mar 2022, per Executive Order EO-2022-019
Tours & Excursions (updated 08 Mar 2022)
⛵ Tour operators may require proof of vaccination or negative test results to participate. Check with the operator to make sure you have what they require.
Events, Stadiums & Theaters (updated 18 Apr 2022)
👪 The capacity limit has been removed, as has the requirement to wear a mask (if less than 1000 people are gathered)
😷 Masks are required at events/activities where 1000 or more people are gathered, effective 18 Apr 2022
🏟️ All attendees at group activities of 1000 or more people at facilities that encourage crowding — indoor or outdoor — must show proof of vaccination with booster (if eligible), OR negative test (molecular or antigen) results of test administered by an authorized health provider no more than 72 hours prior to arrival at the event. Facilities include theaters, amphitheaters, stadiums, conference and activity centers, and any other place where events are held. Effective 10 Mar 2022, per executive order EO-2022-019 and administrative order OA-2022-533
😷 Owners and operators of public and private establishments may, at their discretion, implement health measures that they deem necessary - including requiring the use of masks, and screening for vaccination status or negative test results
📄 These changes go into effect 10 Mar 2022, per Executive Order EO-2022-019
Cruise Ship Passengers (updated 08 Mar 2022)
🚢 All cruise ship passengers and crew who wish to disembark in Puerto Rico must be fully vaccinated, OR must have a negative molecular or antigen COVID test performed within 48 hours before disembarking in PR. All passengers and crew who test positive, or have been in close contact to someone who has tested positive, will not be permitted to disembark in Puerto Rico, regarless of vaccination status.
Air Travelers Arriving in Puerto Rico (updated 08 Mar 2022)
📄 The requirement to complete the travel declaration has been eliminated for ALL travelers arriving in Puerto Rico
✈️ DOMESTIC TRAVELERS (effective 10 Mar 2022, per EO-2022-019)
• The requirement to present a vaccination card or negative test results has been eliminated for DOMESTIC travelers
✈️ INTERNATIONAL TRAVELERS (effective 06 Dec 2021, per CDC)
• All INTERNATIONAL air passengers, regardless of vaccination status, must show (before boarding flight to the US) a negative COVID-19 test taken no more than 1 day before travel to the US. This applies to all travelers, 2 years old and up, flying from INTERNATIONAL (outside of the US) destinations. Flights between Puerto Rico and the States are domestic flights, so this does not apply to travelers arriving in Puerto Rico from the States.

Playa de Jobos and Pozo Jacinto in Isabela

Playa Jobos

If you are looking for a fun beach spot in the north-west part of Puerto Rico, you can head to Playa Jobos (Jobos Beach) in Isabela. This stretch of sand offers surfing, beach bars, and a little exploration around the rocky coastline.

One of the things you’ll find there is Pozo Jacinto (Jacinto’s Well) — a rock formation that has a legend attached to it. The whole beach and coastline area is a pretty thing to see, but, like much of the north-west coast, Playa Jobos is not a swimming beach — so you’ll just be content with a little sun and fun on the beach.

The town of Isabela is located along the coast about 2 hours west of San Juan. Isabela offers some of the best surfing in Puerto Rico. In fact, many professional surfing events are held here every year. While the surfing is great at Playa Jobos (winter and spring are the best times, so I hear), Jobos Beach has more to offer than just surfing.

Playa Jobos

Playa Jobos

Jobos Beach is a long, but narrow, strip of sand that is very popular with locals and tourists alike. Depending on the weather and surf conditions, there may be a shallow area where you can cool off in the water — but be very aware that there is an extremely dangerous rip current at this beach.

Before entering the water find out if there is a rip current, and if there is, find out where it is. All too often surfers risk their own lives saving swimmers that got caught in the rip current.

Playa Jobos

Though Playa Jobos is mainly a surfing or sun bathing beach, it is also a great place to hang out and party. There are some beach bars and restaurants, where you can relax, have a drink, and watch the surfers. Those places serve low-cost local fare and drinks. There are some places that rent beach chairs.

We went to Playa Jobos on a Thursday, in late summer, and the waves were about 3-4 feet, so just a few guys were surfing. There was a handful of people on the beach and hanging out in the local establishments. But on weekends … watch out … the whole area gets crowded and active!

Pozo de Jacinto

Playa Jobos

We didn’t stay at the beach for a swim, but instead took a walk along the rocky coastline to see Pozo de Jacinto (Jacinto’s Well). It is a little east of the beach. It is a large “hole” in the rocks where, when there are large waves, the seawater shoot up and out of the rocks. Just a little to the east of the large opening is a small hole, where you can hear the sounds of the sea, as it comes and goes, making moaning and chugging sounds. If you are a fan of Anthony Bourdain No Reservations, he visited this spot in his Puerto Rico episode.

The legend of Pozo de Jacinto goes something like this: Jacinto was moving some cows from a pasture in the area. He was leading a cow with a rope, which was tied around his hand. The cow got spooked by something, ran over the rocks, and into the hole, taking Jacinto with it. Both perished.

Playa Jobos

Today, they say that if you go to the edge of the hole and yell in “Jacinto, dame la vaca” (“Jacinto, give me the cow”), Jacinto will respond by splashing you with seawater. In reality, this will only happens when the waves are high and the seas are rough. When we were there, the seas were calm, and Jacinto did not splash us.

Nearby the Pozo de Jacinto you will find the end of a walking/bike path.

Details

Playa Jobos

If you venture out onto the rocks, be careful. Stay away from the edge. The rocks are rough and sharp – hard-soled shoes are a must.

The rip currents at Playa Jobos are bad … really bad. More people drown at Playa Jobos than at any other beach in Puerto Rico. There are no life guards, so swimming is at your own risk. If you’re not sure about rip currents, read the warning signs that are posted or ask someone there before you go into the water.

Getting parking at Playa Jobos is tough. Most parking is along the roadside, so space is limited. Don’t leave anything of value in your car. If a restaurant offers paid parking in a lot, that might be the best option.

Playa Jobos is on Road 466 in Isabela.

There are no facilities at Playa Jobos. Only the ones in the restaurants (that are for customers only).

As we mentioned, this is a popular beach for surfing. During high season, lots of people go to the beach, and the area can (unfortunately) get trashy. Some local volunteers try to keep the beach clean. Please do your part by packing out your garbage.

Click on a placename below to view the location on Google Maps ...

PuertoRicoDayTrips.com assumes no responsibility regarding your safety when participating in the activities described in this article. Please use common sense! If your mother or that little voice in your head tells you that you are about to do something stupid … then don't do it! Read more about Safety →

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