Masks Required (updated 13 Jan 2022)
😷 Indoors - Masks covering mouth & nose are required for everyone 2 years old and older, regardless of vaccination status, in public indoor spaces 😷 Outdoors - Masks covering mouth & nose are required for everyone 2 years old and older, regardless of vaccination status, in public outdoor spaces where you cannot socially distance, or where there are 50 or more people
Busness Closure & Dry Law (updated 13 Jan 2022)
πŸ›’ All businesses that serve the public must remain closed from midnight until 5am. Exceptions to closure include supermarkets, gas stations, pharmacies, health facilities, hospitals, among others. Restaurants, clubs, bars, etc ARE closed midnight to 5am. Effective through at least 02 February 2022, per executive order EO-2021-086, and extended by EO-2022-002.
🍺 Dry Law (no sale nor public consumption of alcohol) is in effect from midnight until 5am. Effective through at least 02 February 2022, per executive order EO-2021-086, and extended by EO-2022-002.
Restaurants, Bars & other Food Establishments (updated 13 Jan 2022)
πŸ” ALL CUSTOMERS (2 years old and older) must show proof of vaccination or negative COVID test results - In order to be admitted to food establishments you are required to show either (a) vaccination card showing that you are "fully vaccinated", (b) negative test (molecular or antigen) results of test administered by an authorized health provider no more than 48 hours prior to arrival at the restaurant, or (c) evidence of positive test in last 3 months along with documentation proving your recovery. Effective through at least 02 Feb 2022, per executive order EO-2021-081.
πŸ‘ͺ The capacity of "any place that serves (and people consume) drinks or prepared food" will be limited to 50% if indoors, or 75% if outdoors/open-air. This applies to restaurants, bars, theaters, food courts, etc. Effective through at least 02 February 2022, per EO-2021-085 and extended by EO-2022-002.
Stores, Offices & similar places that serve the public indoors (updated 13 Jan 2022)
πŸ›’ The capacity in all facilities that "serve the public indoors" will be limited to 75%. This applies to stores, malls, offices, etc. Effective 17 Jan 2022 through at least 02 Feb 2022, per EO-2022-002.
Hotels, Resorts & other Lodging (updated 13 Jan 2022)
🏨 In order to check-in to any lodging facility (short-term rentals, AirBNB, hotels, resorts, etc), all members of your party (5 years old and older) are required to show either (a) vaccination card showing that you are "fully vaccinated", (b) negative test (molecular or antigen) results of test administered by an authorized health provider no more than 48 hours prior to your arrival, or (c) evidence of positive test in last 3 months along with documentation proving your recovery. This applies to all people 2 (two) years old and older. If you are unvaccinated and staying more than a week, you are required to show new negative test results weekly. Per executive order EO-2021-062 and EO-2021-075.
Tours & Excursions (updated 13 Jan 2022)
β›΅ Tour operators may require proof of vaccination or negative test results to participate. Check with the operator to make sure you have what they require.
Events, Stadiums & Theaters (updated 13 Jan 2022)
🏟️ All attendees at group activities of less than 250 people at facilities that encourage crowding, indoor or outdoor, must show proof of vaccination OR negative test (molecular or antigen) results of test administered by an authorized health provider no more than 48 prior to arrival at the event. Facilities include theaters, amphitheaters, stadiums, conference and activity centers, and any other place where events are held. This applies to everyone 5 years old and older. Kids under the age of 5 are not permitted to attend these events at all. Effective 22 December 2021, per EO-2021-080, and modified by EO-2022-002
πŸ‘ͺ The capacity of "event or activity venues" will be limited to 50% if indoors, or 75% if outdoors/open-air. This applies to stadiums, coliseums, convention centers, theaters, etc. Effective through at least 02 Feb 2022, per EO-2021-085 and extended by EO-2022-002.
Cruise Ship Passengers (updated 30 Dec 2021)
🚒 All cruise ship passengers and crew who wish to disembark in Puerto Rico must be fully vaccinated, and must have a negative molecular or antigen COVID test performed within 48 hours before disembarking in PR. All passengers and crew who test positive, or have been in close contact to someone who has tested positive, will not be permitted to disembark in Puerto Rico, regarless of vaccination status.
Air Travelers Arriving in Puerto Rico (updated 20 Dec 2021)
✈️ DOMESTIC TRAVELERS (effective 27 Dec 2021, per EO-2021-081)
All DOMESTIC travelers (2 years old and older) arriving in Puerto Rico are are required to show BOTH
  1. negative COVID test results from test administerd by an authorized health provider no more than 48 hours prior to arrival in PR AND
  2. either (a) vaccination card showing that you are "fully vaccinated", (b) negative test results of test administered no more than 72 hours prior to your arrival, or (c) evidence of positive test in last 3 months along with documentation proving your recovery.
  • If you do not have your test results upon arrival, you have 48 hours to produce those results, or you will be fined $300 per person.
  • If you are un-vaccinated, you are required to quarantine for 7 days, even if you have negative test results.
✈️ INTERNATIONAL TRAVELERS (effective 06 Dec 2021, per CDC)
All INTERNATIONAL air passengers, regardless of vaccination status, must show (before boarding flight to the US) a negative COVID-19 test taken no more than 1 day before travel to the US. This applies to all travelers, 2 years old and up, flying from INTERNATIONAL (outside of the US) destinations. Flights between Puerto Rico and the States are domestic flights, so this does not apply to travelers arriving in Puerto Rico from the States.
πŸ“„ ALL TRAVELERS arriving in Puerto Rico are required to submit a travel declaration upon arrival via the PR Government Travel Safe website. This is where you will upload your COVID vaccination card and/or negative COVID test results.

Witness History at the Battle of 1797 Reenactment

Battle of 1797 Reenactment

Did you hear? The British are attacking Old San Juan! Well … OK … not really.

But the British Navy, under orders given by the Sir Ralph Abercrombie, really did attack the Port of San Juan back in 1797. And, to commemorate that event, a reenactment is held each year in Old San Juan, usually on the last weekend of April.

This year, the annual reenactment will be held April 21 to April 24 ,2022.

We have attended this event for the past couple of years, and it was really neat! Even if you have been to Old San Juan and El Morro or Fort San Cristobal before, a visit during the reenactment weekend is really worth it. The men (and women) in uniforms and clothing of the period, following the customs of the period, walking around the area, firing their weapons, and marching in formation really bring the forts alive. You can get great photos, but really, the best part of this reenactment is talking to the people involved in the reenactment.

Some History

Since Puerto Rico was situated in a prime location between the riches of the New World and the home ports of the Old World, many countries wanted the island for their own.

The British made three attempts to take Puerto Rico. The final attempt was in April of 1797. The attack was led by Sir Ralph Abercrombie for the land forces, along with Admiral Henry Harvey for the naval forces. Together, they led a formidable military contingent of more than 4000 (or up to 12,000 depending on which reference you use) British forces.

Battle of 1797 Reenactment

A little bit of trivia I got from talking to the soldiers at the reenactment is that the British forces consisted of British solders, and people of other nationalities who were under the British empire at the time — such as the Royal Highlanders of the 42nd Regiment (who were Scottish) and some German mercenaries.

Their attacks were met by the much smaller Spanish/Puerto Rican contingency, made up of Spanish soldiers, members of the Puerto Rican Fixed Regiment, some free black militia and other citizens, all under the direction of Governor Ramón de Castro. Another piece of trivia I picked up was that there were also French soldiers fighting on the side of Spain.

With the protection of the massive walls and fire power at El Morro, the British ships were stuck — they couldn’t get close enough to do any damage or seize the forts, nor were they able to send supplies to their ground troops. Also, due to the strategic locations of Fort San Geronomo and Fort San Antonio, the attacking grounds troops were unable to get the better of the small but tenacious Puerto Rican militia. In the end, the British retreated after only 14 days of battle.

The reenactment

Every year, in April, the 1797 British Attack on San Juan is commemorated with military drills, firing demonstrations and educational programs. Many local, Puerto Rican living-history volunteers (reenactors) from the Fixed Regiment of Puerto Rico, and others from all over the US, Canada and Spain, come to help bring the past alive.

There are a variety of activities scheduled during the multi-day event, including canon or musket firings, military drills, and sometimes an encampment set up on the lawn outside of El Morro. And, of course, there are plenty of reenactors wandering around that you can talk to and pose with for photos.

Battle of 1797 Reenactment

The Fixed Regiment of Puerto Rico is a regiment of living history volunteers are impressive (you will occasionally see them participating in other activities at the forts). They will be dressed in white linen uniforms made to 18th century Spanish military code.

The volunteers of other nationalities are also dressed in the uniforms of their respective regiments/contingents from that time period. There are even women with them and other living history volunteers, dressed in period clothing as nurses, wives or just regular citizens. We even met a nice Spanish pirate (or "privateer" as he prefered to be called!).

We spent much of the afternoon speaking with a number of the "soldiers" or militia reenactors, and learned a lot of history about the attack on San Juan, their regiments, their real lives, and past living-history reenactments. These volunteers are really into it, and they love to have their pictures taken in uniform. It’s the volunteers that really made this a great event. I strongly recommend that, if you are in Puerto Rico during this time, you come into Old San Juan and see it for yourself.

Now, I do have to mention that the day was a bit unorganized. There is a listed schedule of events for each day. But, instead of a rigid schedule, you need to think of it as a list of activities that may or may not occur at some time throughout the weekend. You really just need to hang around and wait and see. Even with the wait, I still enjoyed myself very much. Since we had some free time waiting between the events, we used the time to learn something, meet a bunch of nice people, and we take some nice photos/videos.

Living History Volunteers — A Call for Participants

This is a call for participation to all you living history volunteers out there. You know who you are. It’s you folks that make events like these so enjoyable!

We went to the reenactment on a Friday and there were maybe 35 re-enactors. The British troops were sorely under-represented! On Saturday, there were more people on all sides — but the more the merrier!

Battle of 1797 Reenactment

We spoke with a number of the volunteers, and here are some of their comments:

  • Most of them did not know much about Puerto Rico (except some of the bad press that the island gets), so many of their regiments did not make the trip. But everyone we spoke to was impressed by their time here and the beauty of the island. Many were already planning to return next year or even extend their trips. So all you living history volunteers — come on down. You will be pleasantly surprised!
  • They also said that it is REALLY HOT here. Yes, even in April. Be ready for 85°F (in the shade) and 80% humidity (or more). But, on the bright side, there is usually a breeze at the forts.
  • The "schedule" was a bit loosey-goosey. The guys we talked to said that it was like being in the army — hurry up and wait. But, other than being hot, they all seemed to really be enjoying themselves.

More Information

Visit the Regimiento Fijo de Puerto Rico webpage for more information and re-enactor registration.

Check Their Facebook page for times and schedule. Las actividades estΓ‘n sujetas a cambio o cancelaciones.

Living History Volunteers – If you want to participate in this event as a re-enactor, you must register with the Regimiento Fijo de Puerto Rico, Inc. The registration information and forms can be found by clicking on the 1797 Event link of the Regimento Fijo de PR web site.

Click on a placename below to view the location on Google Maps ...

PuertoRicoDayTrips.com assumes no responsibility regarding your safety when participating in the activities described in this article. Please use common sense! If your mother or that little voice in your head tells you that you are about to do something stupid … then don't do it! Read more about Safety →

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