Mask Requirement (updated 18 Apr 2022)
😷 Masks are not required, neither indoors (with some execptions) nor outdoors. Masks are recommended in indoor situations where you cannot be certain of the vaccination status of other people
😷 Masks are required inside airports, per Federal/CDC mandates
😷 Masks are required at events/activities where 1000 or more people are gathered, effective 18 Apr 2022
😷 Masks are required indoors in places like hospitals, emergency rooms, nursing homes, medical offices, health centers, clinics, labs, pharmacies, and on public transportation (including taxis and buses). The Department of Health may make masks mandetory in other situations where their use is deemed necessary.
😷 Owners and operators of public and private establishments may, at their discretion, implement health measures that they deem necessary - including requiring the use of masks.
πŸ“„ These changes go into effect 10 Mar 2022, per Executive Order EO-2022-019
Restaurants, Bars & other Food Establishments (updated 08 Mar 2022)
πŸ‘ͺ The capacity limit has been removed, as has the requirment to check for vaccination card or negative test result
😷 Owners and operators of public and private establishments may, at their discretion, implement health measures that they deem necessary - including requiring the use of masks, and screening for vaccination status or negative test results
πŸ“„ These changes go into effect 10 Mar 2022, per Executive Order EO-2022-019
Hotels, Resorts & other Lodging (updated 08 Mar 2022)
πŸ‘ͺ The requirment to check for vaccination card or negative test result has been eliminated
😷 Owners and operators of public and private establishments may, at their discretion, implement health measures that they deem necessary - including requiring the use of masks, and screening for vaccination status or negative test results
πŸ“„ These changes go into effect 10 Mar 2022, per Executive Order EO-2022-019
Tours & Excursions (updated 08 Mar 2022)
β›΅ Tour operators may require proof of vaccination or negative test results to participate. Check with the operator to make sure you have what they require.
Events, Stadiums & Theaters (updated 18 Apr 2022)
πŸ‘ͺ The capacity limit has been removed, as has the requirement to wear a mask (if less than 1000 people are gathered)
😷 Masks are required at events/activities where 1000 or more people are gathered, effective 18 Apr 2022
🏟️ All attendees at group activities of 1000 or more people at facilities that encourage crowding — indoor or outdoor — must show proof of vaccination with booster (if eligible), OR negative test (molecular or antigen) results of test administered by an authorized health provider no more than 72 hours prior to arrival at the event. Facilities include theaters, amphitheaters, stadiums, conference and activity centers, and any other place where events are held. Effective 10 Mar 2022, per executive order EO-2022-019 and administrative order OA-2022-533
😷 Owners and operators of public and private establishments may, at their discretion, implement health measures that they deem necessary - including requiring the use of masks, and screening for vaccination status or negative test results
πŸ“„ These changes go into effect 10 Mar 2022, per Executive Order EO-2022-019
Cruise Ship Passengers (updated 08 Mar 2022)
🚒 All cruise ship passengers and crew who wish to disembark in Puerto Rico must be fully vaccinated, OR must have a negative molecular or antigen COVID test performed within 48 hours before disembarking in PR. All passengers and crew who test positive, or have been in close contact to someone who has tested positive, will not be permitted to disembark in Puerto Rico, regarless of vaccination status.
Air Travelers Arriving in Puerto Rico (updated 08 Mar 2022)
πŸ“„ The requirement to complete the travel declaration has been eliminated for ALL travelers arriving in Puerto Rico
✈️ DOMESTIC TRAVELERS (effective 10 Mar 2022, per EO-2022-019)
β€’ The requirement to present a vaccination card or negative test results has been eliminated for DOMESTIC travelers
✈️ INTERNATIONAL TRAVELERS (effective 06 Dec 2021, per CDC)
β€’ All INTERNATIONAL air passengers, regardless of vaccination status, must show (before boarding flight to the US) a negative COVID-19 test taken no more than 1 day before travel to the US. This applies to all travelers, 2 years old and up, flying from INTERNATIONAL (outside of the US) destinations. Flights between Puerto Rico and the States are domestic flights, so this does not apply to travelers arriving in Puerto Rico from the States.

Sail the Day Away on the Pez Vela in Culebra

Capt. Bill is sailing!>

Culebra Day Sail

Culebra is a small island off the east coast of Puerto Rico, that offers some great water-based activities — beautiful beaches, great snorkeling & SCUBA diving, and awesome fishing. There are some even smaller, less-visited islands surrounding Culebra that are just begging to be explored. But, to get to those, you need a boat.

Captain Bill Penfield offers charters to all areas around the waters of Cuelbra on his Pez Vela sailboat. It is a great way to spend a day (or more)!

The Pez Vela (which means Sailfish, in English) is a 33-foot catamaran sailboat that holds a maximum of 6 guests. This means there is plenty of room to spread out onboard while Captain Bill sails you around to all the best sites.

Culebra Day Sail

Usually, it is an all-day trip (from 10am until about 5pm) with snacks, lunch and drinks included. However, we went out with him on a special low-season trial excursion, which was supposed to be just a half-day tour. But Captain Bill is very generous with his time (and I think he just likes sailing and helping people enjoy their day), and we spent almost a full day out on the water.

Our trip was a BYOL (bring your own lunch), so we didn’t get to taste his much praised fresh-cooked lunch, but we still got a taste of the islands and offerings around the northeast of Culebra — the beautiful blue water, white sand coves, deserted beaches, hiking on Culebrita and snorkeling.

Our Trip — Not the Usual

After a few phone conversations with Captain Bill, our sail day finally arrived. My main objective was to get to the lighthouse on Culebrita, and he promised we would be able to do that, so I was happy before we even got started.

Culebra Day Sail

He docks his boat in Fulladoza Bay, right across the street from Club Seaborne (and just down the street from Bahia Marina, where we were staying). So, after a quick drive down to the dock, we said our hellos and boarded the boat. His dog Gigi was there, and she was so sweet and a great "salty dog" — she could walk around the deck even while sailing rough seas!

Our group that day was 6 people — 4 in our party and 2 in another party. The boat is large enough that we had room to spread out, but intimate enough that we could all talk.

A storm was threatening on the day we went out, so while it looked clear in the morning, Captain Bill was concerned our day would deteriorate and the wind and waves would pick up. He warned us of the possibility of bad weather, and we all decided we would take our chances with the weather and hope for the best.

Culebra Day Sail

While we worked our way out of Ensenada Honda and up and around the eastern part of the island, Captain Bill talked about Culebra, what it is like living there, things to do on the island, what beaches and houses we were passing, and answered any questions we threw at him. He is a really pleasant guy.

As we made our way around the east end of Culebra, the island of Culebrita came into view. We headed over to Culebrita, and we moored the boat on the south side of the island. We all got off the boat and made our way to Bohou Beach. Even Gigi … she rides the surf board in to the beach.

Since the boat can’t anchor on the beach, you need to either swim to shore, or use the surfboard. Captain Bill dry bags you can use so your cameras and other items won’t get wet while you’re making your way to the beach. The boat has a ladder to climb up out of the water.

Culebra Day Sail

As I said earlier, our plan was to hike to the lighthouse, so Captain Bill directed us to the trailhead for the path that would lead us there. He also told us where the best snorkeling was from this beach.

Everyone on the boat opted to first hike to the lighthouse. We all set off on a 15-minuted hike that afforded some amazing views. We spent a long while up at the lighthouse, and we got some beautiful photos. The other couple went back to the boat a little early to get in some snorkeling.

Culebra Day Sail

Once we were all finished with hiking and snorkeling, we got back onto the boat, and Captain Bill pointed out the approaching storm. We all decided to weather the storm on the water, and then to hopefully have a chance to do some snorkeling over at Cayo Norte. So we sailed around Culebrita a little (just so we could see some of the pretty beaches) and then over toward Cayo Norte.

The storm came upon us pretty quickly, so we all helped Captain Bill drop the sail quickly, we donned the raincoats he had in the hull, and we rode out the storm. It only lasted about 10 minutes, with cold rain and gusty wind. Then, as quickly as it started, the storm was over and it cleared up.

Culebra Day Sail

After the storm, we were able to go snorkeling off the south side of Cayo Norte, which was really nice. The water was still pretty clear and not too rough. We saw all sorts of fish, squid, and even had a pair of remora that accompanied us the whole time.

As fate would have it, the engine on the boat got stuck in reverse. But Captain Bill just called for a tow, and we quickly got back to dock.

Even though it was not a perfect trip, we had a little adventure, a lot of fun, took some great photos, and we had a nice long day on the water — much more than we paid for! We all enjoyed it a lot.

A More Typical Tour

Culebra Day Sail

Captain Bill knew we were going to writing about this trip, and he wanted us to point out that this was not a typical tour! Weather issues and engine troubles can happen anywhere to anybody. To me, as long as they are handled calmly and safely (as they were), that is all you can ask for. This half day trial trip was a trial run, and it will not be offered in the future.

The usual full-day trip can be customized to your likes/desires — whether it is fishing, snorkeling, swimming with the turtles, or a combination of all of these. They usually make a stop at Tortuga Beach on Culebrita to swim with turtles and play in the "baths". During the usual trip, they also drag fishing lines behind the boat while en route, so usually there is fresh fish for lunch (though Captain Bill can customize lunch to your preferences). He also offers deep sea fishing trips, and private charters.

Details

Captain Bill’s prices vary depending on each trip, but the usual all-day sail starts at about $125 per person, lunch, drinks, snacks and snorkel equipment included. Private charters, family rates, deep sea fishing charters, and other options can be worked out.

Captain Bill operates 7 days/week, and trips usually start around 10am. Reservations are required. More info: try his Facebook page

Captain Bill speaks English. For Spanish-speaking guests, he will arrange to have a Spanish-speaking first mate on board.

You can call Captain Bill at 787-215-3809 or 787-246-5451 for more information or to make a reservation

.

FYI, there is a head on the boat if you need it.

If Captain Bill is already booked, you can try Captian Dan Classic Sails Day Tours. They offer a single-hulled sailboat and are available in "winter months" out of the Culebra Town Dock. You can contact them at 510-552-8295, or check their web site for more information.

Click on a placename below to view the location on Google Maps ...

PuertoRicoDayTrips.com assumes no responsibility regarding your safety when participating in the activities described in this article. Please use common sense! If your mother or that little voice in your head tells you that you are about to do something stupid … then don't do it! Read more about Safety →

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